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Circuit Breakers - Residential
Arc Fault Circuit Interrupter (AFCI)

Arc Fault Circuit Interrupter (AFCI)





This product qualifies for HomeSphere** builder incentives.Residential electrical fires occur around 70,000 times a year. A significant portion of these fires can be attributed to arc faults. An arc fault is the flow of electricity over an unintended path. These arcs can exceed temperatures of 10,000° F and easily ignite combustible materials in the home. AFCIs are devices that protect your home by detecting dangerous arcs and safely de-energizing the circuit.
 

 

 

 

 

Arc faults arise from a number of situations, including:

  • Damaged wires
  • Receptacle leakage
  • Neutral leads pinched to grounded metal box
  • Worn electrical insulation
  • Loose electrical connections
  • Shorted wires
  • Wires or cords in contact with vibrating metal
  • Overheated or stressed electrical cords and wires
  • Misapplied/damaged appliances


Branch/Feeder AFCI

A Branch/Feeder AFCI has the ability to detect and neutralize a parallel arc fault, which is the unintentional flow of electricity between two separate wires. There are three types of parallel arc faults: line-to-line, line-to-ground, and line-to-neutral. The Branch/Feeder AFCI is permitted by the 1999-2005 NEC® Code.

 

Combination AFCI

GE's Combination AFCI delivers 5 kinds of protection:

  1. Parallel protection − Just like its Branch/Feeder counterpart, Combination AFCI can detect and neutralize parallel arc faults
  2. Series Protection − A series arc fault is the unintended flow of electricity over a gap within a single wire. These arc faults were not detectable until advanced technology allowed the development of the Combination AFCI breaker.
  3. Ground protection − Arcing between a single conductor and a ground line
  4. Overload protection
  5. Short circuit protection

 

The Combination AFCI represents advancement in technology and home protection. The 2008 NEC** Code mandates that all dwelling areas in the home have Combination AFCI protection:

  • Bedroom
  • Living room
  • Dining room
  • Sun room
  • Hallway
  • Closet
  • Finished basement
  • Rec room

 

 

AFCISafety.org

A one-stop resource for AFCI safety information distributed by the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA)

 

Residential Electronic Circuit Interrupters Brochure